Category Archives: Kerry

Sarah Kliff Unloads Yet Another Awful Voxplanation

Is “awful” too harsh an adjective for Vox.com, the faux-educational ‘splainer site run by alleged wunderkind and intellectual giant Ezra Klein? One Twitter user, after reading our last piece on health beat reporter Sarah Kliff, didn’t think so.

Vox has also been called “terrible” and “a joke.” The staff has been referred to as “complete idiots” and likened to “sleazy mob lawyers.”  David Harsanyi of The Federalist writes that “Vox makes us stupid.”

Let’s agree to call them awful. Because they really are. Say it like Donald Trump would. 

NEW YORK, NY - MARCH 09:  Donald Trump and Melania Knauss-Trump attend the Comedy Central Roast Of Donald Trump at the Hammerstein Ballroom on March 9, 2011 in New York City.  (Photo by Andrew H. Walker/Getty Images)   Original Filename: GYI0063876060.jpg

“Vox is awwwwwwful!”

In her latest awful health care ‘splainer, Kliff tells us “Why your health bills are getting higher, in one chart.” And Kliff, who is now rather famous for producing pieces that cover only part of the story, once again fails to disappoint her reader(s)!

Let’s be clear: she really doesn’t explain “Why your health bills are getting higher, in one chart.” She only informs the reader that one component — the deductible — is on the rise. As if we hadn’t noticed.

She must believe Americans open bills from their doctors or hospitals and think, “Whaa?? How did this happen to me? I sure hope Sarah Kliff can ‘splain this!”

But see, she doesn’t. She just calmly ’splains that “This is your new deductible. On steroids.”

Actually, middle-class Americans already realize that Obamacare has made everything related to health care — not just deductibles — awfully expensive. Copayments and coinsurance are rapidly increasing. So are pharmaceutical and medical device costs, narrow networks (“if you have a doctor you like, you will be able to keep your doctor”) and insurers’ “medical necessity” audits and preauthorization requirements.

Why, oh why, is this happening, dear Sarah?

She’ll never admit this, of course, but it’s by design, courtesy of Obamacare architects like Jonathan Gruber, Zeke Emanuel, John Kerry, and The Won. You’re supposed to embrace this financial pain. It’s supposed to be awfully good for you. It’ll force you to reconsider scheduling that physician visit (as if you relished such appointments before) and filling your prescription order.

Never mind that it’s causing people to avoid care. (Shush!)

And never mind that you weren’t told of this plan before you voted in 2010 and beyond.

Kliff would have you believe these cost increases are occurring because “bosses are mean and stingy.” That is her implication in this, the latest of three articles in which she’s complained about deductibles and NOT mentioned the source of this pain: Obamacare’s Cadillac Tax on company health plans. 

(You can read all about the forty percent excise tax here and here.)

Kliff is merely taking a page from her progressive elders’ script: blaming company owners — for rising health care expenses and dropped policies — was the plan all along. 

Emanuel advanced this move in an interview with FOX news anchor Chris Wallace:

The president — look, the law does not say “Sears, drop coverage.” Sears decides what’s good for Sears… When the private companies decide that they’re going to drop people or put them in the exchange, you blame President Obama. He is not responsible for that.

Yeah, that’s right. The Preezy didn’t write an executive order commanding Sears to trim or drop company plans. He and his fellow Obamacare masterminds just made it a whole lot harder for Sears to keep its doors open. Paying a forty percent excise tax on health policies would put many firms out of business; employers simply have no choice but to skimp on or terminate company insurance.

We’re not alone in noticing Kliff’s awful omissions. The Tax Foundation also offered commentary on her latest skewed article:

Vox today covered the issue of rising deductibles in the U.S. health care market. As with their past coverage of the issue, there is a curious omission from the piece: the Cadillac tax…A number of outlets have linked this industry trend of higher deductibles to the Cadillac Tax. If Vox is to live up to its tagline and “explain the news,” it should perhaps give some consideration to the possible explanation offered by reports from Kaiser Family Foundation and Mercer, both of which link the Cadillac Tax to higher cost-sharing or consumer-directed health plans (CDHPs). This explanation for the news, for example, was considered by journalists at Bloomberg, the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, and the Los Angeles Times, in today’s papers alone. It may behoove Vox to give it a look.

Kliff has a documented history of recycling information, but this is getting ridiculous — and, yes, awful! — for a former Washington Post writer.

Three articles on increased worker cost-sharing and yet NO mention of the Cadillac Tax? 

While some may have previously believed Sarah Kliff was just goofy, inattentive, and lazy, there’s no reason to think she wants her reader(s) to be anything but ignorant.

Shame on you, Sarah Kliff. Like your boss, you’re nothing but a progressive propagandist.

How awful of you!

H/T Citizen researcher Kathy in Alabama

John Kerry Is No More Trustworthy Than The Disgraced Jonathan Gruber

In summer of 2009, as Obamacare crafters were assembling their plan to destroy the U.S. health care industry, they faced several problems, and most of them involved financing.

Over twenty years ago, Mrs. Clinton’s health reform plan died when the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) determined it would cost too much. 

Learning from her failure, White House officials knew they had to create a plan the CBO could score as budget-neutral. But where, oh, where, would they find the money to not only subsidize insurance purchases but also fund an “unknowable” number of new agencies, boards, commissions, and task forces? 

It was at that point in late-July that Obama’s economic team advocated that the plan eliminate the tax exemption for job-based insurance. What was later dubbed the Cadillac Tax would result in an estimated federal tax grab of $250 billion per year. 

But, as Jonathan Gruber told a Boston audience, any plan that ended the tax exclusion would have been a political hot potato. “Economists have called for 40 years to get rid of the regressive, inefficient and expensive tax subsidy provided for employer provider health insurance…It turns out politically it’s really hard to get rid of.”

That’s where then-Senator John Kerry became Gruber’s “Massachusetts hero” by introducing a scheme to trick Americans. “No, no,” Gruber quotes Kerry, “we’re not going to tax your health insurance. We’re going to tax those evil insurance companies!” 

 When we all know it’s a tax on people who hold those insurance plans.

An ordinary person responsible for such duplicity might have experienced regret, even shame. But not Kerry, who, like Gruber, aimed to exploit Americans’ “lack of basic economic understanding.”

Less than six months later, Kerry doubled down on his deceit, penning a January 2010 Huffington Post piece explaining his support for the Cadillac Tax.

It will help control future health care costs without — I repeat without — directly taxing employees.

Notice the word “directly?” By this he means the tax on insurance companies will be borne by the worker, but certainly not clearly or directly. It was intended that Americans blame insurance companies and employers for jacking up premiums, deductibles, and copayments. (In fact, Harvard faculty members are already blaming the university for out-of-pocket cost increases.) Later, they hope, we will curse our bosses for eliminating job-based insurance altogether.

The excise tax included in the Senate-passed health care bill will affect only a small portion of the very highest cost health plans.

Not according to the American Health Policy Institute, who projects the tax will “hit 17 percent of all American businesses, and 38 percent of large employers” in 2018. And as Gruber explained, the method establishing the yearly tax threshold means that eventually all plans will be subject to the Cadillac Tax. 

For the small sub-set of plans that are affected, the likely impact will be to increase workers’ wages. MIT economist Jon Gruber recently found that the excise tax included in the Senate bill would lead employers to raise wages by $223 billion between 2010 and 2019. In 2019, wages for those affected by the provision will be higher by about $660 per household. I repeat — raise wages.

Did anyone think to ask Kerry how a tax on insurance companies naturally produces higher pay for America’s workers? That’s a curious connection, isn’t it?

Well, you see, Secretary Kerry conveniently omitted the “Employers-Kill-Your-Health-Plan” factor in his analysis. What he failed to mention is his apparent belief that, as employers shrink insurance benefits or dump employees in Obamacare exchanges, they’ll compensate them with higher wages. 

(By the way, this is an assumption based on Gruber modeling, the same model predicting that our health insurance premiums would fall under Obamacare.) 

Finally,

After spending years and years hearing from workers tired of seeing their unions forced to spend all of their energy at the bargaining table just to hold on to health care instead of negotiating for better wages, we now have a way to help increase wages and improve health care simultaneously.

If Kerry believed union workers would gleefully skip off to the Obamacare exchanges, he was wildly uninformed.

Let’s not forget: this is the same John Kerry currently negotiating a nuclear agreement with Iran. 

More than likely, Iran’s mullahs will fare better than Americans have with Obamacare. 

But they may have to sign the deal to find out what’s in the deal.